Deprecated: Assigning the return value of new by reference is deprecated in /home/cci/domains/concretecountertopinstitute.com/public_html/include/common.php on line 58 Portland Cement: Type I, II, III - Whats the Difference? - Tech Talk > Mix Ingredients - See subcategories > Cements - Portland and CSA - Articles : Concrete Countertops, Institute, Concrete Connections, Raleigh, NC : The Concrete Countertop Institute
SmartSection is developed by The SmartFactory (http://www.smartfactory.ca), a division of InBox Solutions (http://www.inboxsolutions.net)

Articles

> Tech Talk > Mix Ingredients - See subcategories > Cements - Portland and CSA > Portland Cement: Type I, II, III - What's the Difference?

Portland Cement: Type I, II, III - What's the Difference?

Published by Admin on 2006/6/20 (55203 reads)
Portland cement comes in a variety of different types. In the United States, these types are classified as Type I, II, III, IV and V. Only Types I and III are necessary for consideration by concrete countertop fabricators; the benefits of Type II cement are generally irrelevant to the concrete countertop industry.


Type I is ordinary Portland cement, and it is available in white or gray.



Type II is a moderate sulfate resistant cement, important when concrete is cast against soil that has moderate sulfate levels.



Type III is a high early strength cement. It is ground finer and reacts faster than Type I, so the early strength gains are greater. However the ultimate strength is not higher than Type I. Concrete made with Type III will have slightly higher 28 day strengths than concrete made with Type I, all else being equal. Type III is available in white or gray, but white Type III is difficult to find in small (less than pallet) quantities; it often has to be special ordered.



Type IV and V are often used in special construction applications where high sulfate resistance is required or a low heat of hydration is important. Neither of these types are practical choices for countertops.


Navigate through the articles
Previous article CSA Cements: Rapid Strength With A Low Carbon Footprint
The comments are owned by the poster. We aren't responsible for their content.
 

View all of our student success stories, or click each photo below for that student's success story: